Common Ties

Author: Katherine Davis Cann

Softcover (ISBN: 978-1-891885-54-9 )
$14.95

Common Ties brings the rich and unique history of Spartanburg Methodist College to life through the voices of students and the countless men and women who gave their best to assure its future.

Publication Date: Oct 2007
Dimensions: 6 x 9 in.
296 pages

People said he was different and possessed by a dream, but such comments did not deter David English Camak as he worked to fulfill his vision of a common school for textile mill workers. Using his considerable persuasive skills, Camak convinced prominent citizens of Spartanburg, South Carolina, to support the establishment of Textile Industrial Institute.

Common Ties: A History of Textile Industrial Institute, Spartanburg Junior College and Spartanburg Methodist College is the story of that school from its establishment in 1911 through its time as Spartanburg Junior College and now Spartanburg Methodist College, a two-year liberal arts institution, which recently celebrated its centennial.

“Professor Cann provides us with the definitive story of the twentieth century effort to provide education for textile mill workers in upstate South Carolina,” says Dr. A.V. Huff Jr., professor emeritus of history at Furman University. “With careful research and skillful writing, she recounts empathetically the plight of the workers and the heroic struggle of David English Camak and his successors.”

Katherine Davis Cann

Katherine Davis Cann

Katherine Davis Cann is an historian of the New South. She currently serves as professor of history and chair of the Social Science Division at Spartanburg Methodist College. In 2007, she received an Excellence in Teaching Award from the South Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities. Dr. Cann holds degrees from Lander College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the University of South Carolina. Her Ph. D. dissertation, a social and economic history of South Carolina in the 1920s, complements her research on the textile industry in the South Carolina piedmont.